OKUDA


BIO

Born in Santander, Spain.  Lives and works in Madrid, Spain.
 
Okuda San Miguel graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts from Madrid’s Complutense University. His unique iconographic language of multicolored geometric structures and patterns on the streets, railroads and abandoned factories around the globe have made him one of the world’s most recognizable street artists of today. Highly sought after for large scale projects, Okuda is perhaps best known for his conversion of an abandoned Spanish church aptly named Kaos Temple, which has become a new icon of contemporary art.
 
Parallel to his work outdoors, in 2009 Okuda started his own studio practice and his fine art has been exhibited in galleries from India, Mali, Mozambique, United States, Japan, Chile, Brazil, Peru, South Africa, Mexico and the European continent among others.
 
In his work, rainbow geometric architectures blend with organic shapes, bodies without identity, headless animals and symbols that encourage reflection in artistic pieces that could be categorized as Pop Surrealism with a clear essence of street forms. His works often raise questions about existentialism, the universe, the infinite, the meaning of life, and the contradictions of the false freedom of capitalism, showing a conflict between modernity and our roots; ultimately, between man and the same.

Okuda's distinctive style of geometric harmonies emboldened with intense colours can make his artworks feel like they're from a parallel universe. His large-scale murals and street sculptures can be found dominating parks and squares in towns around the world. Okuda's mixed media approach to works on canvas and paper is diverse with elements of embroidery, collage and wood, highlighting his insatiable thirst for creation and multitalented ability.


ARTIST STATEMENT

“My art reflects my love for metamorphosis. Playing with shape and form I highlight this juxtaposition within my characters, mixing up their shapes and personalities. I paint my faces with geometric patterns to show equality among the different races, placing all skin types on the same level; multicolours symbolise multiculturalism.
 
My works always have a touch of some recognizable elements, for example, eyes are painted with the black and white of the cosmic universe. I use colors as a symbol of life and the natural world, whilst the grey scale in my paintings represents cement, death, dust and the material of classical sculptures. I am constantly challenged to find a harmonious balance of the grey scale with my vibrant palette. 
 
I need to create to be happy, and feel alive. Art is the meaning of my life”